Inflammation

Inflammation

Professor Elizabeth Hartland, CEO, discusses inflammation.
LISTEN TO Professor Elizabeth Hartland, CEO, discussing inflammation.

Inflammation underpins hundreds of health conditions, contributing to more than 50 percent of deaths worldwide and an escalating burden of disease. Chronic inflammation leads to cancer, lung, heart, kidney and liver diseases, asthma, infertility, endometriosis, neurodegenerative conditions such as multiple sclerosis and autoimmune diseases like diabetes; it’s also the single biggest cause of death from COVID-19.

Hudson Institute has Australia’s largest team of inflammation researchers, whose sole focus is developing treatments to prevent or alleviate inflammation-driven diseases.

Inflammation diseases we research

Antimicrobial resistance

Antimicrobial resistance

Infectious diseases are caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites that enter the body and cause damage to our tissues. Antimicrobial resistance occurs when these infectious agents become resistant to the drugs that would normally kill them or inhibit their growth.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified antimicrobial resistance as one of the top ten global public health threats that has the potential to reverse the great advances of medicine in the last 100 years. The global problem of anti-microbial resistance is largely due to genetic changes that arise in bacteria as these organisms are exposed to antibiotics. This natural form of biological evolution has been accelerated by factors such as misuse of prescription antibiotics, poor adherence to dose and regimens, counterfeit or substandard antibiotic preparations in some countries, poor infection control and global trade and travel.

If antimicrobial resistance advances at its current pace, medicine will reach the point where we are no longer able to treat common bacterial infections. Research organisations, such as Hudson Institute, are joining the worldwide effort to prevent this from happening.

What causes antimicrobial resistance?

Why is antimicrobial resistance a problem?

What are the implications for treatment?

Diagnosis and treatment

How to combat antimicrobial resistance

Our antimicrobial resistance research

Hudson Institute researchers are at the forefront of the fight against antimicrobial resistance. Our researchers have a deep knowledge of bacterial growth dynamics and the diseases they cause, as well as human immune responses to infections, and how bacteria fight back. We are working to overcome antimicrobial resistance by studying

  • How common illnesses, such as gastroenteritis and pneumonia are affected by antimicrobial resistance
  • How antibiotic resistance spreads
  • How bacteria infect cells so we can design drugs to block them
  • How our immune system controls bacterial infection so that we can enhance it against drug resistant bacteria and viruses
  • Ways to enable our microbiome (use link instead) to resist infection with pathogens
  • Identify new compounds and pathways that can be used to target resistant bacteria.

High-tech drug screening against cell-invading bacteria

Professor Elizabeth HartlandMolecular studies. New treatments. Repurposing drugs used to treat unrelated conditions is a new approach to treating multidrug resistant bacteria infections.

Led by Professor Elizabeth Hartland, this project uses high-throughput technology to screen drug samples against bacteria that replicate within human cells, including Salmonella Typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila.

Unlike traditional antibiotics that directly target bacteria, this work will identify compounds that boost protective responses in human cells or block human cell processes fundamental to bacterial growth.

Understanding a rapidly emerging type of multidrug resistant Salmonella

Multi-drug resistant Shigella

Antimicrobial resistance in the human microbiota (microorganisms)

New therapies to prevent or treat Helicobacter pylori infection

Antimicrobial resistance collaborators

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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

Around one in every 20 Australians aged 45 years and over suffers from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

What causes antimicrobial resistance?

Why is antimicrobial resistance a problem?

What are the implications for treatment?

Diagnosis and treatment

How to combat antimicrobial resistance

Our COPD research

Hudson Institute scientists have discovered that COPD could be diagnosed and treated earlier, preventing the progression of the disease in thousands of patients. They are working on a blood test to bring the discovery to patients.

High-tech drug screening against cell-invading bacteria

Professor Elizabeth HartlandMolecular studies. New treatments. Repurposing drugs used to treat unrelated conditions is a new approach to treating multidrug resistant bacteria infections.

Led by Professor Elizabeth Hartland, this project uses high-throughput technology to screen drug samples against bacteria that replicate within human cells, including Salmonella Typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila.

Unlike traditional antibiotics that directly target bacteria, this work will identify compounds that boost protective responses in human cells or block human cell processes fundamental to bacterial growth.

Understanding a rapidly emerging type of multidrug resistant Salmonella

Multi-drug resistant Shigella

Antimicrobial resistance in the human microbiota (microorganisms)

New therapies to prevent or treat Helicobacter pylori infection

COPD collaborators

Support for people with COPD

Hudson Institute scientists cannot provide medical advice.
If you would like to find out more information about COPD, please visit

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COVID-19

COVID-19

COVID-19 is a highly contagious disease caused by a strain of coronavirus, SARS-CoV2. While around two per cent of people who get the flu in a typical season have severe or life-threatening complications requiring hospitalisation, around 10 per cent of COVID-19 cases result in life-threatening complications.

COVID-19 is set to be the third-leading cause of death in Australia in the first seven months of 2022, after ischaemic heart disease and dementia, and ahead of cerebrovascular disease and lung cancer.

What causes antimicrobial resistance?

Why is antimicrobial resistance a problem?

What are the implications for treatment?

Diagnosis and treatment

How to combat antimicrobial resistance

Our COVID-19 research

COVID-19 has highlighted how damaging out-of-control inflammation can be. Patients with severe COVID-19 develop out-of-control inflammation as their bodies try to fight the virus. This triggers a severe hyper-inflammatory response leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and organ failure. Restricting this inflammatory response could help save lives.

Hudson Institute researchers are using their world-leading inflammation expertise to understand how this response happens and develop treatments to mitigate the deadly inflammation caused by COVID-19.

“There is still so much we don’t know about the dangerous and damaging inflammation that leads to acute respiratory distress syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cancer, heart disease, kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease and more,” Prof Hartland says.

“Hudson Institute already has 150 expert scientists and clinicians working on inflammation – the largest concentration of inflammation researchers in Australia.”

Professor Elizabeth Hartland, CEO, discusses inflammation. LISTEN TO PODCAST HERE

High-tech drug screening against cell-invading bacteria

Professor Elizabeth HartlandMolecular studies. New treatments. Repurposing drugs used to treat unrelated conditions is a new approach to treating multidrug resistant bacteria infections.

Led by Professor Elizabeth Hartland, this project uses high-throughput technology to screen drug samples against bacteria that replicate within human cells, including Salmonella Typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila.

Unlike traditional antibiotics that directly target bacteria, this work will identify compounds that boost protective responses in human cells or block human cell processes fundamental to bacterial growth.

Understanding a rapidly emerging type of multidrug resistant Salmonella

Multi-drug resistant Shigella

Antimicrobial resistance in the human microbiota (microorganisms)

New therapies to prevent or treat Helicobacter pylori infection

Donate and help fight COVID-19

SUPPORT OUR RESEARCH

COVID-19 collaborators

Support for people with COVID-19

Hudson Institute scientists cannot provide medical advice.
Find out more about COVID-19.

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Gastroenteritis

Gastroenteritis

Gastroenteritis is a common disease of the gut that can be highly infectious and make you feel sick very quickly. It is triggered when the digestive system becomes infected and inflamed, causing abdominal cramps, diarrhoea and vomiting with severity ranging from a mild tummy upset to severe and life-threatening dehydration.

Gastroenteritis is a major burden in developing countries and can be fatal for infants, older adults and people with compromised immune systems. Diarrhoeal disease is the second leading cause of death in children under five and kills around 525,000 children globally every year.

What causes antimicrobial resistance?

Why is antimicrobial resistance a problem?

What are the implications for treatment?

Diagnosis and treatment

How to combat antimicrobial resistance

Our gastroenteritis research

As antimicrobial resistance becomes more widespread and current treatment measures become less effective, the development of new therapeutics and vaccines for gastroenteritis is more important than ever.

Despite medical advances, gastroenteritis still kills many children and elderly people each year, particularly in developing countries. Our researchers are working on better vaccines and therapeutics to prevent severe gastroenteritis and save lives. This includes research to harness the protective properties of the human microbiome.

Hudson Institute researchers are using specialist preclinical infection models and genetic screens to lay the groundwork for improved drug efficacy and to understand the infection mechanisms of a diverse range of bacteria and viruses that cause life threatening disease. This work has the potential to rapidly advance the treatment of gastroenteritis and the prevention of serious illness or death.  

High-tech drug screening against cell-invading bacteria

Professor Elizabeth HartlandMolecular studies. New treatments. Repurposing drugs used to treat unrelated conditions is a new approach to treating multidrug resistant bacteria infections.

Led by Professor Elizabeth Hartland, this project uses high-throughput technology to screen drug samples against bacteria that replicate within human cells, including Salmonella Typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila.

Unlike traditional antibiotics that directly target bacteria, this work will identify compounds that boost protective responses in human cells or block human cell processes fundamental to bacterial growth.

Understanding a rapidly emerging type of multidrug resistant Salmonella

Multi-drug resistant Shigella

Antimicrobial resistance in the human microbiota (microorganisms)

New therapies to prevent or treat Helicobacter pylori infection

Gastroenteritis collaborators

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Inflammation and cancer

Inflammation and cancer

You are alive because of inflammation. It is your body’s natural response to infection or injury. In normal circumstances, inflammation eliminates foreign invaders (bacteria or viruses), damaged cells to heal wounds within hours or days.

However, this life-saving friend can also turn to foe. Chronic inflammation is linked to more than 50 per cent of all deaths worldwide and at least one in five cancers.

What causes antimicrobial resistance?

Why is antimicrobial resistance a problem?

What are the implications for treatment?

Diagnosis and treatment

How to combat antimicrobial resistance

Our research in inflammation and cancer

Hudson Institute scientists are studying how chronic inflammation contributes to the emergence of some deadly cancers, including pancreatic, lung and stomach cancer.

By identifying the mechanisms of our immune system that drive inflammation and cancer, we can better understand how inflammation is involved in tumour formation and growth. This knowledge will aid in the development of inflammation-targeting drugs that fight cancer progression and alleviate disease.

High-tech drug screening against cell-invading bacteria

Professor Elizabeth HartlandMolecular studies. New treatments. Repurposing drugs used to treat unrelated conditions is a new approach to treating multidrug resistant bacteria infections.

Led by Professor Elizabeth Hartland, this project uses high-throughput technology to screen drug samples against bacteria that replicate within human cells, including Salmonella Typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila.

Unlike traditional antibiotics that directly target bacteria, this work will identify compounds that boost protective responses in human cells or block human cell processes fundamental to bacterial growth.

Understanding a rapidly emerging type of multidrug resistant Salmonella

Multi-drug resistant Shigella

Antimicrobial resistance in the human microbiota (microorganisms)

New therapies to prevent or treat Helicobacter pylori infection

Inflammation and cancer collaborators

Support for people with inflammation and cancer

Hudson Institute scientists do not provide medical advice.
Find out more about inflammation and cancer.

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Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

One in 200 Australians, including up to 10,000 children, suffer from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) – an incurable painful and disruptive disease that often requires hospitalisation and surgery. In rare cases, it can be life threatening.

What causes antimicrobial resistance?

Why is antimicrobial resistance a problem?

What are the implications for treatment?

Diagnosis and treatment

How to combat antimicrobial resistance

Our Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) research

Hudson Institute scientists are world-renowned specialists in the gut microbiome and are leading this game-changing area of research, including the discovery of more than 130 new gut bacteria.

By combining their expertise in immunology, clinical disease and genomics they are discovering common protective and inflammation-causing gut bacteria in IBD patients and identifying treatments to target those bacteria.

High-tech drug screening against cell-invading bacteria

Professor Elizabeth HartlandMolecular studies. New treatments. Repurposing drugs used to treat unrelated conditions is a new approach to treating multidrug resistant bacteria infections.

Led by Professor Elizabeth Hartland, this project uses high-throughput technology to screen drug samples against bacteria that replicate within human cells, including Salmonella Typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila.

Unlike traditional antibiotics that directly target bacteria, this work will identify compounds that boost protective responses in human cells or block human cell processes fundamental to bacterial growth.

Understanding a rapidly emerging type of multidrug resistant Salmonella

Multi-drug resistant Shigella

Antimicrobial resistance in the human microbiota (microorganisms)

New therapies to prevent or treat Helicobacter pylori infection

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) collaborators

Support for people with Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

Hudson Institute scientists cannot provide medical advice.
Find out more about inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

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Influenza

Influenza

Over the past decade there has been a rise in hospitalisations and deaths due to influenza (flu). There are around 3500 deaths in Australia linked to the flu each year and 18,000 hospitalisations.

While vaccination can help prevent the flu, when patients with severe flu are admitted to hospital there are no effective drugs available to reduce the response to the virus.  Hudson Institute inflammation researchers are focusing on finding treatments to help these patients.

2022 flu season – what you need to know.

What causes antimicrobial resistance?

Why is antimicrobial resistance a problem?

What are the implications for treatment?

Diagnosis and treatment

How to combat antimicrobial resistance

Our influenza research

Our leading scientific teams with expertise in inflammation, infection and immunity hold vital clues to help tackle deadly virus outbreaks. They are working to discover new treatments that can dampen damaging immune responses.

High-tech drug screening against cell-invading bacteria

Professor Elizabeth HartlandMolecular studies. New treatments. Repurposing drugs used to treat unrelated conditions is a new approach to treating multidrug resistant bacteria infections.

Led by Professor Elizabeth Hartland, this project uses high-throughput technology to screen drug samples against bacteria that replicate within human cells, including Salmonella Typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila.

Unlike traditional antibiotics that directly target bacteria, this work will identify compounds that boost protective responses in human cells or block human cell processes fundamental to bacterial growth.

Understanding a rapidly emerging type of multidrug resistant Salmonella

Multi-drug resistant Shigella

Antimicrobial resistance in the human microbiota (microorganisms)

New therapies to prevent or treat Helicobacter pylori infection

Influenza collaborators

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Lupus

Lupus

Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease that sees the body’s immune system attack its own tissues and organs. More common in women than men, it can inflame the skin, blood cells, joints, kidneys, brain, heart, and lungs.

Lupus is difficult to diagnose as its many symptoms may mimic those of other conditions. They may be mild or cause significant disability.

Some people are born with a tendency to develop lupus, but it can be triggered without warning by an infection, some prescription drugs or even sunlight. There is no cure, but treatments can manage the symptoms. 

What causes antimicrobial resistance?

Why is antimicrobial resistance a problem?

What are the implications for treatment?

Diagnosis and treatment

How to combat antimicrobial resistance

Our lupus research

Lupus is a difficult disease to diagnose and treat. Hudson Institute researchers are investigating improved ways to detect lupus, and treatments that may control its triggers and better target its symptoms.

High-tech drug screening against cell-invading bacteria

Professor Elizabeth HartlandMolecular studies. New treatments. Repurposing drugs used to treat unrelated conditions is a new approach to treating multidrug resistant bacteria infections.

Led by Professor Elizabeth Hartland, this project uses high-throughput technology to screen drug samples against bacteria that replicate within human cells, including Salmonella Typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila.

Unlike traditional antibiotics that directly target bacteria, this work will identify compounds that boost protective responses in human cells or block human cell processes fundamental to bacterial growth.

Understanding a rapidly emerging type of multidrug resistant Salmonella

Multi-drug resistant Shigella

Antimicrobial resistance in the human microbiota (microorganisms)

New therapies to prevent or treat Helicobacter pylori infection

Lupus collaborators

Support for people with Lupus

Hudson Institute scientists cannot provide medical advice.
Find out more about Lupus.

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Microbiome in health and disease

Microbiome in health and disease

There are trillions of microbes living inside and on the surface of your body, altogether they are call the microbiome and are vital to your health and fighting disease.

Since the microbiome was first recognised in the late 1990s, scientists have identified more than 2,000 microbial species from the largest microbiome, in the gut. The skin, bladder and genitals also harbour microbiome populations.

While microbes are symbiotic (benefiting you and the microbes), and some are pathogenic (disease-causing), in a healthy person, the symbiotic and pathogenic microbes work in balance. Imbalances, known as dysbiosis, disrupt the microbes, making people more susceptible to conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and Clostridioides difficile infection, which causes severe diarrhea and inflammation of the colon or colitis.

What causes antimicrobial resistance?

Why is antimicrobial resistance a problem?

What are the implications for treatment?

Diagnosis and treatment

How to combat antimicrobial resistance

Our microbiome in health and disease research

Our scientists are at the forefront of understanding the complex microbiome communities. These answers will improve the understanding of why an illness develops and how best to treat it. The pioneering work of the Institute’s Synnate program is exploring new medical frontiers to answer how the innate immune system distinguishes ‘friend from foe’ and how these interactions control the immune system. In collaboration with commercial partners our scientists are developing microbial therapies to treat unmet medical need for patients with IBD.

High-tech drug screening against cell-invading bacteria

Professor Elizabeth HartlandMolecular studies. New treatments. Repurposing drugs used to treat unrelated conditions is a new approach to treating multidrug resistant bacteria infections.

Led by Professor Elizabeth Hartland, this project uses high-throughput technology to screen drug samples against bacteria that replicate within human cells, including Salmonella Typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila.

Unlike traditional antibiotics that directly target bacteria, this work will identify compounds that boost protective responses in human cells or block human cell processes fundamental to bacterial growth.

Understanding a rapidly emerging type of multidrug resistant Salmonella

Multi-drug resistant Shigella

Antimicrobial resistance in the human microbiota (microorganisms)

New therapies to prevent or treat Helicobacter pylori infection

Microbiome in health and disease collaborators

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